Advertisement
Heart, Lung and Circulation

Fire and Flood: The Cardiovascular Impact of Natural Disasters – A Regional New South Wales Experience

Published:April 13, 2022DOI:https://doi.org/10.1016/j.hlc.2022.02.013
      The adverse impact of environmental factors on health outcomes is increasingly recognised, and climate change is projected to drastically influence a variety of climate-sensitive health outcomes worldwide [
      • Haines A.
      • Ebi K.
      The Imperative for Climate Action to Protect Health.
      ]. Australia has experienced a series of extreme weather events in quick succession and events are anticipated to increase in response to climate change [
      • Beggs P.J.
      • Zhang Y.
      • McGushin A.
      • Trueck S.
      • Linnenluecke M.K.
      • Bambrick H.
      • et al.
      The 2021 report of the MJA-Lancet Countdown on health and climate change: Australia increasingly out on a limb.
      ]. Individuals living in regional and remote areas are disproportionately affected by the impact of natural disasters—property damage, damage to public infrastructure, poor access to services and emotional impacts [
      • Clemens S.L.
      • Berry H.L.
      • McDermott B.M.
      • Harper C.M.
      Summer of sorrow: measuring exposure to and impacts of trauma after Queensland's natural disasters of 2010-2011.
      ]. In this Commentary, we highlight the cardiovascular consequences of extreme weather conditions in Port Macquarie, exacerbating existing health disadvantages in this vulnerable regional population.

      Keywords

      To read this article in full you will need to make a payment

      Purchase one-time access:

      Academic & Personal: 24 hour online accessCorporate R&D Professionals: 24 hour online access
      One-time access price info
      • For academic or personal research use, select 'Academic and Personal'
      • For corporate R&D use, select 'Corporate R&D Professionals'

      Subscribe:

      Subscribe to Heart, Lung and Circulation
      Already a print subscriber? Claim online access
      Already an online subscriber? Sign in
      Institutional Access: Sign in to ScienceDirect

      References

        • Haines A.
        • Ebi K.
        The Imperative for Climate Action to Protect Health.
        N Engl J Med. 2019; 380: 263-273
        • Beggs P.J.
        • Zhang Y.
        • McGushin A.
        • Trueck S.
        • Linnenluecke M.K.
        • Bambrick H.
        • et al.
        The 2021 report of the MJA-Lancet Countdown on health and climate change: Australia increasingly out on a limb.
        Med J Aust. 2021; 215: 390-392.e22
        • Clemens S.L.
        • Berry H.L.
        • McDermott B.M.
        • Harper C.M.
        Summer of sorrow: measuring exposure to and impacts of trauma after Queensland's natural disasters of 2010-2011.
        Med J Aust. 2013; 199: 552-555
        • Elsworthy E.
        NSW flooding forces 18,000 people to evacuate, schools closed, workers told to stay home 2021.
        (Available from:)
        • Wolhuter K.
        • Arora M.
        • Kovacic J.C.
        Air pollution and cardiovascular disease: can the Australian bushfires and global COVID-19 pandemic of 2020 convince us to change our ways?.
        Bioessays. 2021; 43e2100046
        • Haikerwal A.
        • Akram M.
        • Del Monaco A.
        • Smith K.
        • Sim M.R.
        • Meyer M.
        • et al.
        Impact of Fine Particulate Matter (PM2.5) Exposure During Wildfires on Cardiovascular Health Outcomes.
        J Am Heart Assoc. 2015; 4
        • Morgan G.
        • Sheppeard V.
        • Khalaj B.
        • Ayyar A.
        • Lincoln D.
        • Jalaludin B.
        • et al.
        Effects of bushfire smoke on daily mortality and hospital admissions in Sydney, Australia.
        Epidemiology. 2010; 21: 47-55
        • Delfino R.J.
        • Brummel S.
        • Wu J.
        • Stern H.
        • Ostro B.
        • Lipsett M.
        • et al.
        The relationship of respiratory and cardiovascular hospital admissions to the southern California wildfires of 2003.
        Occup Environ Med. 2009; 66: 189-197
        • Hanigan I.C.
        • Johnston F.H.
        • Morgan G.G.
        Vegetation fire smoke, indigenous status and cardio-respiratory hospital admissions in Darwin, Australia, 1996-2005: a time-series study.
        Environ Health. 2008; 7: 42
      1. Air quality special statement spring-summer 2019-20: PM2.5 particles 2020.
        (Available from:)
        • Adikari D.H.
        • Kushwaha V.V.
        • Jepson N.S.
        Collateral damage: the cardiovascular cost of suppressing COVID-19 transmission in Australia.
        Heart Lung Circ. 2020; 29: 1109-1111
        • Babaie J.
        • Pashaei Asl Y.
        • Naghipour B.
        • Faridaalaee G.
        Cardiovascular diseases in natural disasters; a systematic review.
        Arch Acad Emerg Med. 2021; 9: e36
        • Butterly S.J.
        • Indrajith M.
        • Garrahy P.
        • Ng A.C.
        • Gould P.A.
        • Wang W.Y.
        Stress-induced takotsubo cardiomyopathy in survivors of the 2011 Queensland floods.
        Med J Aust. 2013; 198: 109-110
        • Razavi A.C.
        • Kelly T.N.
        • He J.
        • Fernandez C.
        • Whelton P.K.
        • Krousel-Wood M.
        • et al.
        Cardiovascular disease prevention and implications of Coronavirus disease 2019: an evolving case study in the crescent city.
        J Am Heart Assoc. 2020; 9e016997
        • Allahwala U.K.
        • Denniss A.R.
        • Zaman S.
        • Bhindi R.
        Cardiovascular disease in the post-COVID-19 era - the impending tsunami?.
        Heart Lung Circ. 2020; 29: 809-811
        • Gregory A.T.
        • Pepe S.
        • Denniss A.R.
        COVID-19 and Heart, Lung and Circulation: riding the 2020 waves of change in Australia & New Zealand.
        Heart Lung Circ. 2020; 29: 1737-1740